If you display these 11 behaviors, you’re probably an ambivert

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Some people love to talk about how much of an introvert or extrovert they are.

For others, things aren’t so clear-cut.

They display a balance of extrovert and introvert features.

One day they can hang out with a big group without a second thought. The next, they don’t even want to be around people.

Do you think that’s you?

If you display these 11 behaviors, you’re probably an ambivert.

In other words, you get the best of both worlds.

1) You don’t like to label yourself

When people ask whether you’re an introvert or an extrovert, you say you’re both.

You realize that you don’t fit neatly into these two traditional categories, so you explain that you possess a mixture of traits.

People contain multitudes – and you’re uncomfortable labeling yourself as one or the other.

Which is fine.

Personality traits can be fluid. You’re a chameleon who can tailor your behavior based on circumstances, mood, and company.

2) You’re the life of the party

As an ambivert, you have the ability to thrive in social situations, and you can even display a party animal persona on occasion.

Since you’re adept at interacting with others, you come across as charismatic and outgoing as long as you feel comfortable in the environment you’re in.  

People might describe you as the one who always:

  • Tells jokes or funny stories
  • Initiates conversations with everyone present
  • Suggests fun activities the whole group can enjoy
  • Can effortlessly fit into any clique
  • Radiates enthusiasm and positivity

Being the life of the party doesn’t mean being the loudest person in the room. It’s about letting your vibrant personality shine, which automatically attracts other people.

All this with one caveat: you only do it on high-energy days.

On low-energy days, your behavior resembles the next point on the list.

3) You ghost your friends without notice

Since you possess both extroverted and introverted qualities, you also have days or weeks when you don’t feel like being around people.

That’s when you prefer to be alone to catch up with your thoughts and process your emotions.

You might also take this isolation to extremes and ignore messages from your friends because replying to everyone suddenly feels overwhelming.

It’s all good. You’ll make it up to them during your next peppy phase.

4) You pencil in alone time

Since alone time is a necessity every now and then, you make it a point to schedule it, but you may do so tentatively.

For instance, you block out Sundays solely for yourself, but still go out if an exciting opportunity pops up or you wake up with a strong desire for others’ company.

You’re pretty flexible about breaking your own rules. That’s because you can’t always tell what mood you’ll be in on any given day.    

5) You don’t mind small talk

As an introvert, I hate small talk.

I would rather ask a stranger to share their darkest secret than politely chat about the weather.

(I won’t because I don’t approach strangers as a general rule, but you get the idea.)

You, however, don’t have any problems with it.

In fact, you’ve mastered the art.

You can discuss current events, inquire about people’s travel plans, ask your co-workers about how they spent their weekend Monday after Monday after Monday.

Light-hearted conversations come naturally to you, even if you would occasionally prefer to tackle more complex and emotional topics.

6) You crave deep conversations

Speaking of, your introverted side appreciates a lengthy, meaningful conversation.

The kind that brings you closer to someone, explores existential questions, or challenges your beliefs.

It’s all about context.

While casual acquaintances might only be familiar with the bubbly and social version of you, your real friends know there’s plenty below the surface.

Additionally, you’re probably empathetic and have a knack for making people open up.  

Since you understand both introverts and extroverts, you can consider different perspectives, making you more attuned to the feelings of others.

7) You can adjust to any situation

Remember what I said about being a chameleon?

That’s your superpower: you can adapt to a plethora of social situations.

Whether it’s making small talk with a stranger in the waiting room at the dentist, having a heart-to-heart with a relative, or sitting in silence with a friend who has a bad day, you rarely miss a beat.

You feel at ease and confident in various settings, so you have a better chance of connecting with different types of people.

Needless to say, this makes you an excellent manager, enabling you to tweak your leadership style based on the needs of the team and the situation.

8) You like meeting new people

Introverts would prefer to meet no one new ever.

Extroverts seek out opportunities to meet new people all the time.

Ambiverts? They’re okay with new people, but the extent of their enthusiasm depends on their energy and state of mind.

It’s not as complicated as it sounds.

If you’re an ambivert at a social gathering, for instance, you’re likely already feeling hyped, so you’ll mingle.

On a low-energy day, hanging out with your partner or best friend is more than enough.  

9) You have a lot of acquaintances

Ambiverts tend to have large social circles but few close friends.

If that’s you, you likely know many people yet only consider a small number of them your ride-or-die.  

You have friends you go to parties with, work friends, book club friends, gym friends, and so on. 

Above all, you have a couple of friends that would bail you out of jail, no questions asked.

In other words, you can always find someone to go out with, but you can count your true friends on the fingers of one hand.  

This is a healthy attitude since it enables you to have your social needs met without becoming overstimulated.

10) You occasionally love the spotlight

Since ambiverts have strong social skills, they don’t mind the spotlight, especially in moderation.

For reference, introverts can get uncomfortable when they have to speak up in a larger group, while extroverts often enjoy being the center of attention.

As an ambivert, you don’t require people to notice you to be content, but you have no issue speaking up if you have something to say or being celebrated when the situation calls for it.

11) You’re all about balance

Finally, if you’re an ambivert, balance is your middle name:

  • You love hanging out with people but need alone time to recharge
  • You like big parties and small gatherings in equal measure
  • You can connect with people yet don’t feel like being social 24/7
  • You can collaborate on tasks at work as well as do solo projects

This balanced approach to life and relationships gives you a sense of belonging while allowing enough time for self-reflection and personal growth.   

Bottom line

Introversion and extroversion resemble a spectrum, and ambiverts fall smack dab in the middle.

If you recognize yourself in the behaviors above, you likely have a winning personality and maintain excellent relationships with those around you.

At the same time, you tend to your inner world regularly and don’t mind spending time alone.

Congratulations! You’ve got it all.

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