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14 things high achievers don’t waste their time on

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Although we all have the same 24 hours in a day, why is it that some achieve more than others?

One of the reasons for that is how they manage their time.

Our day-to-day life is filled with things that want to take our attention away from what’s important to us: ads, discount promos, new movies and series.

Simply wanting to be a high achiever doesn’t make one immune to falling for these things.

It takes dodging and navigating through these attractive time vacuums.

Below are 14 more things that high achievers don’t bother with to help you become one yourself.

1. Focusing on Things That Don’t Matter to Them

If their focus is on music, they aren’t going to spend the majority of the time learning how to paint or traveling with their friends; they’re most likely going to spend most of their waking hours with their instrument, practicing over and over again.

Understanding what matters to them is important to a high achiever because it’s what allows them to keep pushing forward and improving – especially in times of failure.

2. Eating Too Much Junk Food

The food you eat has a significant impact on your productivity.

Research has shown that we digest food in different ways depending on what it is.

We may eat a hamburger to be more efficient for lunch, but since it’s higher in fat, it takes more effort for our bodies to digest, thus using more energy.

That’s why you might feel mentally foggy or even tired after eating a large cheeseburger.

Think of high-performing athletes. They don’t gorge on chocolate and cheeseburgers. They stick to their lean proteins and vegetables (or whatever their diet recommends).

They need the energy from these foods to keep up their energy.

It shows that what high achievers do while they aren’t working is just as important as what they do while they are.

3. Mindlessly Scrolling Through Social Media

Social media isn’t all bad. It’s what allowed people from around the world to collaborate when it literally could not have been possible otherwise.

Thousands of hours of content, interviews from scholars and successful people, and courses from experts are shared for free.

But in that same pile are thousands of hours of content that are only for entertainment.

There’s nothing wrong with consuming entertainment once in a while.

But high achievers know to be careful with their consumption habits, or else they fall into an easy addiction.

4. Setting Small Goals

They’re called “high achievers” for a reason. If they’re musicians, they aren’t the type to settle for just a record deal and some album sales.

They shoot for the moon: they imagine themselves winning the Grammy.

Others might already say that they’re a success already.

They’ll be performing at various concerts and shows often throughout the year.

But high achievers never stop climbing; they’re always striving for more.

They do this by understanding the big picture and then setting smalls over a period of time to achieve that picture.

This allows them to keep going and avoid being stuck in a rut.

I learned about this from Life Journal, created by the highly-successful life coach and teacher Jeanette Brown.

You see, willpower only takes us so far…the key to transforming your life into something you’re passionate and enthusiastic about takes a shift in mindset about what your real purpose is, and effective goal setting.

And while this might sound like a mighty task to undertake, thanks to Jeanette’s guidance, it’s been easier to do than I could have ever imagined.

Click here to learn more about Life Journal.

Now, you may wonder what makes Jeanette’s course different from all the other personal development programs out there.

It all comes down to one thing:

Jeanette isn’t interested in being your life coach.

Instead, she wants YOU to take the reins in creating the life you’ve always dreamt of having.

So if you’re ready to stop dreaming and start living your best life, a life created on your terms, one which fulfills and satisfies you, don’t hesitate to check out Life Journal.

Here’s the link once again.

5. Trying to Impress Others

High achievers don’t waste their time trying to please others.

They put in the effort because they care more about the work itself, regardless of what other people think of it.

They aren’t the type to follow trends.

They carve their own path and make something their own.

If they’re a painter, they work tirelessly to produce work that they believe is good.

It’s this drive that makes high achievers stand out and be in a league of their own.

6. Focusing on What’s Outside of Their Control

No matter how hard high achievers work, they understand that only so much of their success is in their control. It’s always a gamble.

So what they do is to do as much as they can to increase the odds of it landing in their favor.

The high achieving writer would do their best to learn the methods and mindsets of successful authors to try to produce bestsellers themselves.

They focus on developing their writing abilities, the fundamentals, all without stopping to consider whether other people are going to like it or not.

If others don’t, then they try again on the next project.

7. Listening to Negative People

Who you surround yourself with plays an important role in your own mindset.

Although your friend group right now might be people you’ve known and trusted for years, if all they talk about are negative things such as how impossible it is to be successful in this economy, it might just stop you from pursuing your dreams.

While high achievers try not to surround themselves only with “Yes” people, they want to be with people that genuinely support them, and tell them honestly what they can improve on.

8. Complaining

Some people may spend their time complaining about how they weren’t given the same opportunities as the privileged and wealthy.

They rant and spread hate – but do nothing to either change their circumstance or rise above it.

High achievers don’t let their background stop them from becoming better.

Their basketball shoes might have only been hand-me-downs and their neighborhood court might be slightly run down, but that doesn’t stop them from making the most out of it and honing their skills.

9. They tap Into Their Personal Power

High achievers take responsibility for their lives and tap into their personal power. They don’t let insecurities get the better of them.

I know, it can be difficult in the best of times to not dwell on your insecurities.

But high achievers know that overcoming insecurities start with embracing your strengths.

We all have them, even if we’re not always aware of them.

This is where you start to really tap into your personal power. It’s a process that takes time, but the more you work at it, the stronger you’ll feel — and the stronger it’ll be able to help you.

You see, we all have an incredible amount of power and potential within us, but most of us never tap into it.

We become bogged down in self-doubt and limiting beliefs. We stop doing what brings us true happiness.

I learned this from the shaman Rudá Iandê. He’s helped thousands of people align work, family, spirituality, and love so they can unlock the door to their personal power.

He has a unique approach that combines traditional ancient shamanic techniques with a modern-day twist.

It’s an approach that uses nothing but your own inner strength – no gimmicks or fake claims of empowerment.

Because true empowerment needs to come from within.

In his excellent free video, Rudá explains how you can create the life you’ve always dreamed of and increase attraction in your partners, and it’s easier than you might think.

So if you’re tired of living in frustration, dreaming but never achieving, and of living in self-doubt, you need to check out his life-changing advice.

Click here to watch the free video.

9. Passing the Blame

If something goes wrong, they take accountability for their own mistakes.

They understand that skirting around the blame won’t solve any problems.

So they admit to their mistakes and learn from it to improve themselves moving forward.

If they’re a swimmer and they lose the race, they don’t blame their coach for giving them a hard time, or the people around them for ruining their mindset.

They learn from their mistakes and try to become mentally and physically stronger the next time.

10. Doubting Themselves

One of the key factors that separates those that achieve great things and those that do not is self-confidence.

High achievers believe in themselves.

They need to; no one else is guaranteed to believe in them.

It’s their belief in themselves that allows them to perform at such a high standard.

If they’re in a meeting and they have a question, they’ll ask for clarifications as much as they can.

They aren’t afraid of looking stupid. They realize that asking these questions is important for them to deliver high-quality results – which they know they will.

11. Doing Things They Know They Wouldn’t Enjoy

Your friend might have asked you to get together for some drinks for a night, but you know you’d rather be at home studying to improve your skills.

But you also don’t want to disappoint your friends.

What do you do?

For most of us, it might be too easy to say Yes then end up regretting our decision the entire night.

High achievers, on the other hand, know how to say No.

All our choices come with sacrifices – even at the cost of two things that are important to us.

Although high achievers might value their friends, they might value their personal success much more.

It isn’t an easy decision, which is why high achievers stand out so much.

12. Comparing Themselves to Others

High achievers don’t spend their time looking at other people’s works – they’d rather spend their time with their head down, focusing on their own things.

With how prevalent social media is, self-comparison has become much more common.

The problem with that is it could lead to crippling self-doubt.

So what high achievers might do instead is to track their progress every week or month. This way, the only person they’re competing against is their past self.

13. Dwelling on the Past

We’ve all done things in our lives that we aren’t proud of.

Constantly replaying the past isn’t going to get you anywhere, and high achievers know this.

The only way they know how not to waste the past is by learning from it.

Often, it’s our greatest mistakes that teach us the most valuable lessons in life.

Though high achievers still feel sadness and regret, they aren’t the type to wallow in it.

They look forward and move on, always improving.

14. Waiting for the Perfect Moment to Start

While others are dreaming about starting a business or pursuing a passion project, high achievers don’t wait on anyone’s permission or “the right moment” to start. They just do it.

They know that the “right moment” is a myth and that they’ll never actually get to the point where they’re “actually” ready.

Author James Clear once wrote that “successful people start before they’re ready.”

Billionaire entrepreneur Peter Thiel, in his book Zero to One, once wrote that “having a bad plan is better than having no plan.” They take that leap of faith and get going.

Becoming a High Achiever

Becoming a high achiever takes more than just saying you’re one. It’s a lifestyle. It starts with setting goals and then achieving them.

The problem is:

Many of us feel like our life is going nowhere.

We follow the same old routine every day and even though we try our best, it just doesn’t feel like our life moves forward.

So how can you overcome this feeling of being “stuck in a rut”?

Well, you need more than just willpower, that’s for sure.

I learned about this from Life Journal, created by the highly-successful life coach and teacher Jeanette Brown.

You see, willpower only takes us so far…the key to transforming your life into something you’re passionate and enthusiastic about takes perseverance, a shift in mindset, and effective goal setting.

And while this might sound like a mighty task to undertake, thanks to Jeanette’s guidance, it’s been easier to do than I could have ever imagined.

Click here to learn more about Life Journal.

Now, you may wonder what makes Jeanette’s course different from all the other personal development programs out there.

It all comes down to one thing:

Jeanette isn’t interested in being your life coach.

Instead, she wants YOU to take the reins in creating the life you’ve always dreamt of having.

So if you’re ready to stop dreaming and start living your best life, a life created on your terms, one which fulfills and satisfies you, don’t hesitate to check out Life Journal.

Here’s the link once again.

Putting yourself first

Hey, Lachlan from Hack Spirit here.

What’s your number one goal at the moment?

Is it to buy that car you’ve been saving up for?

To finally start that side-hustle that’ll hopefully help you quit your 9-5 one day?

Or to take the leap and finally ask your partner to move in?

Whatever it is, you’re not going to get there, unless you’ve got a plan.

And even then…plans fail.

But I didn’t write this to you to be the voice of doom and gloom…

No, I’m writing this because I want to help you achieve the goals you’ve set.

I’ve recently been taking part in a workshop called Life Journal created by teacher and career coach Jeanette Brown.

Covering all the basics and more on what’s needed to reach your goals, Jeannette tackles everything from creating habits and new behavior patterns to putting your plans into action.

She doesn’t mess around – this workshop will require effort on your part but that’s the beauty of it – Jeanette has carefully designed it to put YOU in the driving seat of your life.

Click here to find out more about Life Journal.

So…think back to that important goal I asked about at the start of this message.

How much do you want it?

Are you willing to put the effort in to get there?

If so, check out the workshop here.

If you do take part, I’d love to hear how your Life Journey goes!

All the best,
Lachlan

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Written by Lachlan Brown

I’m Lachlan Brown, the founder, and editor of Hack Spirit. I love writing practical articles that help others live a mindful and better life. I have a graduate degree in Psychology and I’ve spent the last 15 years reading and studying all I can about human psychology and practical ways to hack our mindsets. If you want to get in touch with me, hit me up on Facebook or Twitter.

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